Keto Controls Hormones

Why Low-Carbs Rule For Weight Loss By Controlling Fat Hormones

I do not need to add too much to this as the conclusions of this study below as they are pretty astounding and go with what we already knew right?  Something to pay attention too is their comment about Leptin and Ghrelin. Ghrelin one of your hunger hormones, the ones that drive you to eat something and Leptin, is the hormone that says you are full.  Low-carbs impact these both in a good way. This is why I would never try to do Intermittent Fasting or even fasting before went Keto gave it a month or two before doing IF.

Cheers,
Andrew
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Results Total energy expenditure differed by diet in the intention-to-treat analysis (n=162, P=0.002), with a linear trend of 52 kcal/d (95% confidence interval 23 to 82) for every 10% decrease in the contribution of carbohydrate to total energy intake (1 kcal=4.18 kJ=0.00418 MJ). Change in total energy expenditure was 91 kcal/d (95% confidence interval −29 to 210) greater in participants assigned to the moderate carbohydrate diet and 209 kcal/d (91 to 326) greater in those assigned to the low carbohydrate diet compared with the high carbohydrate diet. In the per protocol analysis (n=120, P<0.001), the respective differences were 131 kcal/d (−6 to 267) and 278 kcal/d (144 to 411). Among participants in the highest third of pre-weight loss insulin secretion, the difference between the low and high carbohydrate diet was 308 kcal/d in the intention-to-treat analysis and 478 kcal/d in the per protocol analysis (P<0.004). Ghrelin was significantly lower in participants assigned to the low carbohydrate diet compared with those assigned to the high carbohydrate diet (both analyses). Leptin was also significantly lower in participants assigned to the low carbohydrate diet (per protocol).

Conclusions Consistent with the carbohydrate-insulin model, lowering dietary carbohydrate increased energy expenditure during weight loss maintenance. This metabolic effect may improve the success of obesity treatment, especially among those with high insulin secretion.

Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02068885.

Click Here for the link to the Study.

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